Sixteen states have more people in prison cells than college dorms

Sixteen states have more people in prison cells than college dorms


Originally posted on theGrio:

College or prison, which is more important?  In 16 states in the land of the free, the answer is prison.

As was reported in MetricMaps, there are 16 states where there are more bodies filling up the prisons than there are students living in college dormitories.  What is truly fascinating, maybe even disturbing, is that nearly all of these 16 states are located in the South, the bottom portion of the country. You must view the map in order to appreciate the gravity of the situation.

Let than sink in for a minute.  More people behind bars than in the dorms. What could it be about the South that would explain this?  Could it be a tradition of slavery, racial violence and Jim Crow segregation, a legacy of criminalizing and dehumanizing people, and of just not treating folks very well?

(MetricsMap) (MetricsMap)

Keep in mind that the United States has…

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Corporation Literally Served Inmates Trash

Corporation Literally Served Inmates Trash


curi56:

shutterstock_145645000 Credit: Shutterstock

Originally posted on The Fifth Column:

shutterstock_145645000 Credit: Shutterstock

This is about a contractor that got caught.  How many other prison contractors around the country use the same despicable practice?

Think Progress

Two weeks ago Progress Michigan uncovered emails revealing that a prison food provider served cakes nibbled on by rats to inmates. They’ve now discovered that employees from this same food vendor, Aramark, served inmates at another facility an equally unsavory meal: garbage.
In an email exchange between the company’s general manager, Sigfried Linder, and the state’s Department of Corrections, Linder admitted that prisoners at Saginaw Correctional Facility were served food that was previously thrown in the trash. “Mr. Chisolm discarded the left-overs from the line before the last half unit was in the chow hall. He then realized that there were more inmates to serve so he rinsed them off, reheated them in the oven and instructed the inmates to serve them,” read one email. “They refused, so he…

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Former deputy minister of education pleads guilty to some child porn charges

Former deputy minister of education pleads guilty to some child porn charges


Originally posted on ChildreninShadow.wordpress.com:

Former deputy minister of education pleads guilty to some child porn charges

WATCH: Marianne Dimain reports that Benjamin Levin has plead guilty to child porn charges.

TORONTO – A man who was once Ontario’s deputy minister of education has pleaded guilty to three child pornography-related charges in a Toronto court. … http://globalnews.ca/news/1860256/toronto-prof-benjamin-levin-expected-to-plead-guilty-to-child-porn-charges/

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Details of Andreas Lubitz’s troubled past emerge days after Germanwings crash

Details of Andreas Lubitz’s troubled past emerge days after Germanwings crash


Originally posted on National Post:

[np_storybar title=”Andreas Lubitz urged captain to leave cockpit for washroom break so he could crash plane, recording reveals” link=”http://news.nationalpost.com/2015/03/29/andreas-lubitz-urged-captain-to-leave-cockpit-so-he-could-crash-germanwings-jet-recording-reveals/”]

Evidence has emerged that Andreas Lubitz, the co-pilot who last week brought down the Germanwings plane over the Alps, carefully planned his decision to lock the captain out of the cockpit and crash the aircraft.

Details from a transcript of the cockpit voice recorder from Flight 9525, leaked to a German newspaper, appear to show that Lubitz repeatedly badgered Captain Patrick Sonderheimer to leave him alone on the flight deck.

Chillingly, when Capt. Sonderheimer tried to brief Lubitz on plans for a routine landing in Dusseldorf, the First Officer replied: “Hopefully” and “We’ll see.”

In the closing moments of the recording, Capt. Sonderheimer can be heard pleading with Lubitz to open the door before trying to break it down.

“For God’s sake, open the door,” he says, as the screams of…

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Five things we now know about Andreas Lubitz since he crashed Flight 4U 9525 into the French Alps

Five things we now know about Andreas Lubitz since he crashed Flight 4U 9525 into the French Alps


Originally posted on National Post:

Five things we now know about Andreas Lubitz since he flew Germanwings 4U 9525 into the side of a mountain last Tuesday, killing 149 people:

Impending fatherhood

PATRIK STOLLARZ / AFP / Getty Images PATRIK STOLLARZ / AFP / Getty Images

Two weeks before the crash, his girlfriend Kathrin Goldbach, 26, told Lubitz, 27, she was pregnant with their first child, reported the German newspaper Bild, but said the day before the crash that they were through and that she was moving out.

His insecure, controlling personality had been the final straw. The couple had been together for seven years and shared an apartment in Düsseldorf. “He tried to order her what to wear, what men she could speak to, even the length of her skirt,” a friend said. “He was a control freak of the highest order.”

Deteriorating vision

AP/Facebook AP/Facebook

Lubitz sought treatment for vision problems that may have jeopardized his ability to continue working…

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Helen Vera: Keeping prisoners in solitary confinement isn’t just cruel, it’s ineffective

Helen Vera: Keeping prisoners in solitary confinement isn’t just cruel, it’s ineffective


Originally posted on National Post:

Last week, the New York State Department of Corrections announced an agreement to dramatically limit solitary confinement in its prisons. New York’s prison system will now be the largest in the country to stop using solitary as a punishment on prisoners younger than 18. Officials have also vowed to begin removing pregnant women and the developmentally disabled from extreme isolation and to begin cutting back the length of time prisoners may spend in solitary confinement. The agreement is just a first step toward reform in New York, but it’s still a human-rights victory. It’s also smart policy.

As we know from human-rights advocates, medical professionals and psychiatrists — not to mention journalists — the human psyche cannot easily bear being locked in a cell the size of a bathroom for 22 to 24 hours a day. People in solitary confinement spend months, years, even decades of their lives with almost…

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Group launching legal challenge to limit use of solitary confinement in Canadian prisons

Group launching legal challenge to limit use of solitary confinement in Canadian prisons


Originally posted on National Post:

OTTAWA — The first comprehensive legal challenge to Canada’s use of solitary confinement in federal prisons will be launched by the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association and John Howard Society of Canada Monday.

Even as many countries, including the United States, rein in use of segregation in prisons, Canada’s Correctional Investigator says this country has ramped up solitary confinement by 6% in the past five years.

The legal challenge to be filed Monday with the Supreme Court of British Columbia argues that administrative segregation is unconstitutional, amounting to “cruel and unusual punishment” that discriminates in particular against mentally ill and aboriginal inmates.

The suit comes a month after Correctional Services Canada published its response to the inquest into the death of teenage prisoner Ashley Smith, who spent more than 1,000 days in solitary confinement before killing herself in 2007.

[related_links /]

In its response, CSC rejected any new limits on…

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